Friday, 5 June 2009

Boom Boom.

In times where everything can be art, it is refreshing to come across extraordinary skill. Young Chilean artist Diego Lorenzini combines realistic drawings of almost photographic quality with casual sketches and cartoons. He uses everyday materials like pencil, biro and notebook, creating an immediacy that, combined with his pensive humour, strikes as a fresh approach to an established medium.

In the tradition of newspaper cartoons, Lorenzini uses humour to hint at serious issues. However, his artworks go further: Their fractured narrative always leaves space for interpretation. In the “Berlin-series”, for example, comic characters who represent the ‘real’ world imagine portraits which are drawn in the realistic manner of classic etching, though seen from a fisheye-lens perspective. The series was triggered by the concept of communication when Lorenzini, unable to speak German, was living in Berlin.

Lorenzini’s works originate in an anti-sentiment against conceptual art. The former disciple of Eugenio Dittborn, the Chilean artist, renowned for his “Airmail Paintings”, aims to create work that cannot be fully explained by words and that drives away from the minimalist towards a new value for superior craftsmanship.

Diego Lorenzini Correa, born in 1984 in Talca, Chile, graduated with a degree in fine arts from the Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile. In 2005 he first hit the local news when he walked over 250 km from Santiago to Talca with a tortoise on his shoulder. His work has been exhibited in several solo shows in Chile and Argentina, as well as in group shows in South-America and Europe. Lorenzini is currently living in London.

This exhibition from Diego Lorenzini is the bee's knees.

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